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Goodbye, my friend.

Goodbye, my friend.
By siteadmin 9 years ago 70 Views 3 comments

Guest Blogger: Michael Earnheart, Wickford, Rhode Island Showroom Manager

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"Consider this a 'Welcome to the

neighborhood' present,” Arlene said to me. She walked up with her

hands clasped lightly around a tissue-paper wrapped present. She

handed it to me and smiled and said “I knew you were admiring it

and you said you love whales and I had an extra one at home, I

couldn't resist!”

That mug sits on my desk at work, I

drink coffee out of it every day. I used to drink coffee with Arlene

every day, and I can't imagine drinking it alone. Arlene has passed away, but I

remember her saying “transition”, so I will use that phrase

instead.

The news hit me like a freight train,

Arlene was one of the most welcoming and positive people I've ever

met. She had the wisdom of a sage, with the humbleness of a country

farmer. She loved making people smile and effecting positive change

in people's lives. At her store on Main Street in Wickford, RI, where

we were neighbors, she would hold empowerment classes for women and

go to different venues as a motivational speaker and to tend to

battered women and to those who felt hopeless. She believed in good

energy and making sure she gave it off to everyone she met.

Arlene's Place, Arlene's store was just

as unique and wonderful as she was. From her affirmation artwork, to

her oil paintings and scented candles and her knitting...it was just

everything she loved and she made us love it too. She believed strongly in the healing power of her affirmations and I bought an

affirmation for my girlfriend, Jennifer, who was feeling a little

down and it said: “We may not have it all together, but together we

have it all”. Suffice it to say, Jennifer loved the affirmation. Arlene told me that each affirmation is written for someone, but it takes time to find the right owner.

The last day I saw Arlene, she left

early and said she wasn't feeling well. I wished her well and

gave her a hug. She asked me to water her flowers. I nodded and told

her I would. She turned to me said “Goodnight, Michael. I'll see

you for our morning coffee on Tuesday?” I nodded and smiled.

Goodbye Arlene, you will not be soon

forgotten. I will water the flowers and I will see you for coffee,

every time I lift my mug to my lips.

Posted in: Staff Contributors
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