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Small House, Big Impact: Living Responsibly

Small House, Big Impact: Living Responsibly
By siteadmin 9 years ago 69 Views 4 comments

1409919544_c2a678a78aGuest Blogger: Michael Earnheart, Wickford, RI Showroom Manager

At The Clean Bedroom we always enjoy coming across stories about green innovation and ways to change our lives to live more responsibly, with less of an harmful impact on our world. Coming across someone like Jay Shafer is truly extraordinary.

Jay lives in an 89-square foot house. That's right, 8' x 12'! Jay build his house himself and named it Tumbleweed. He was inspired to downsize his life after he essentially got tired of "working for cash" and wanted to spend more time enjoying his life, not worrying about his bills! His home is less than one-tenth the size of the average American home and uses only about $100.00 in utilities a year.

As a child, Jay grew up in a home of 4,000 sq. ft., he said it was "more stuff and more burden than he wanted", and decided to reinvent himself and live simply. Not long after the construction of his new tiny house, did the a business develop. People became interested in his home and he decided to start designing and building "small places."

Trathen Heckman, who has worked in sustainability education for over a decade says that Jay "teaches us a lot about small living because he does it himself and he does it an graceful, elegant and inspiring way and really shifts people's perceptions on the quality of life that can be associated with living with less." 

Jay never thought himself to be an entrepreneur of anything, but it his new found passion to design small houses and says, "There is a lot of excess going on, a lot of extra waste and I'm happy to propose the opposite."

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Finally, Jay tells us he could never go back to living big, "Living small has changed my life dramatically and I couldn't ask for anything better!"

For information about the Tumbleweed homes and other tiny and small designs by Jay Schafer, check out Tumbleweed Houses. Now if Jay wants to buy an adjustable bed or mattress to fit his unique home, we know how to help!

 

Sherman Unkefer 1 month ago at 10:05 AM
I want a house like this very cool.
Sherman Unkefer
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